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What to look for in 2012: Defined contribution plans

April 23rd, 2012 Leave a comment Go to comments

By Tim Connor, Genny Sedgwick

Defined contribution (DC) plans
July 1, 2012, is a significant date for defined contribution (DC) plan sponsors, including persons who have legal responsibility for managing someone else’s money, trustees, and investment committee members. By that date, plan sponsors should have received information from all plan service providers disclosing their status as it relates to the plan, such as an ERISA fiduciary and/or registered investment advisor, their estimated fees, how they are compensated, and the services they provide. The new U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) regulations are intended to improve fee disclosure to regulators, plan sponsors, and plan participants. Plan sponsors have a fiduciary responsibility to review, for reasonableness, the compensation of their service providers that is paid from plan assets both directly and indirectly. However, in our experience, some plan sponsors are not aware of the total amount of fees paid from the plan or how they are calculated.

Many plan fiduciaries may not be aware that it is both a fiduciary breach and prohibited transaction to allow the plan to pay more than what is considered reasonable expenses. In practice, how does a fiduciary determine if plan fees are reasonable? If you’ve taken your plan out to bid within the last three years, you should have current market information and documentation for your due diligence files to support the fees you are paying, or have taken action by going back to your service provider(s) to negotiate lower fees on behalf of plan participants. In lieu of going out to bid, there are other options available: for example, you can benchmark your plan. The DOL has developed fee disclosure worksheets that can be found on their website at: DOL Publications “Understanding Retirement Plan Fees and Expenses “ and “Cost Disclosure Sheet.”

There is nothing in the regulations to imply a plan must have the lowest fees, just that the plan’s fees be reasonable and commensurate with the services provided. Qualitative differences in services may impact fees. For example, quality of service varies with respect to the range of planning and guidance tools available to participants, which may drive up fees. We strongly encourage plan sponsors to develop a diligent process to evaluate fees on an ongoing basis and to document their processes. Costly litigation can be avoided by implementing a sound process, which shows that you have taken reasonable steps to fulfill your plan fiduciary responsibilities.

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