Regulatory roundup

More retirement-related regulatory news for plan sponsors, including links to detailed information.

Report shows Senate tax bill will yield a 10-year revenue loss of $1 trillion
The Joint Committee on Taxation (JCT) published a new analysis indicating that the Senate tax bill would generate enough economic growth to lower its $1.4 trillion revenue cost by only about $458 billion over a decade. After accounting for interest rates, the growth figure would fall to $407 billion, said the JCT. That would leave a 10-year revenue loss of roughly $1 trillion.

To download the report, click here.

Fiduciary rule extended
The Department of Labor (DOL) has extended for 18 months the special transition period under Sections II and IX of the Best Interest Contract Exemption and Section VII of the Class Exemption for Principal Transactions in Certain Assets Between Investment Advice Fiduciaries and Employee Benefit Plans and IRAs.

The document also delays the applicability of certain amendments to Prohibited Transaction Exemption 84-24 for the same period. The primary purpose of the amendments is to give the DOL the time necessary to consider public comments under the criteria set forth in the presidential memorandum of February 3, 2017, including whether possible changes and alternatives to these exemptions would be appropriate in light of the current comment record and potential input from, and action by, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and state insurance commissioners.

For more information, click here.

DOL’s Office of Inspector General releases Semiannual Report to Congress
Regarding the Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA), the Office of Inspector General (OIG) notes it remains concerned with the DOL’s ability to administer and enforce ERISA requirements that protect the benefit plans of approximately 149 million plan participants and beneficiaries, particularly in light of statutory limitations on DOL’s authority.

One challenge facing the EBSA for decades has been that ERISA allows billions in pension assets held in otherwise regulated entities, such as banks, to escape full audit scrutiny. These concerns were renewed by recent audit findings that as much as $3.3 trillion in pension assets, including an estimated $800 billion in hard-to-value alternative investments, received limited-scope audits that provided few assurances to participants regarding the financial health of their plans.

To download the OIG report click here.

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