Tag Archives: defined benefit administration

Formula updates and new options improve retirement benefits

One defined benefit (DB) plan sponsor decided to change how the plan calculated participant benefits from a final average pay formula to a cash balance formula. The change produced two groups of employees with significantly different levels of retirement benefits. Milliman was able to help the sponsor improve the amount of benefits provided to employees as well as give them the ability to receive income in retirement on a flexible basis for employees individual needs. Milliman actuary Vicki Mazzie provides some perspective in this article.

Keeping track of pension participants

Monitoring the life status of pension plan participants and beneficiaries is an important fiduciary requirement. The inability to locate them can produce an administrative burden for plan sponsors. The latest DB Digest article, “Fiduciary responsibilities: Wanted dead or alive,” by Milliman’s Verna Brenner highlights three auditing strategies plan sponsors should consider to effectively track retirees.

Administrative tips for lump-sum window offerings

Lump-sum windows can present a “win-win” scenario for both defined benefit (DB) pension plan sponsors and participants. Sponsors can decrease their Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC) premiums by reducing the amount of participants within a plan. On the other side, participants in need of cash can benefit from a lump-sum payout.

Before implementing a lump-sum window, sponsors must first consider the various administrative aspects related to such an offering. The DB Digest article “Lump-sum windows: Administrative tips to consider” by Nicholas Pieper highlights these nine administrative tips that can help plan sponsors with the process.

• Identify the eligible population
• Clean up the data
• Seek legal counsel assistance
• Determine the duration of your window
• Set a manageable deadline
• Deliver an announcement mailing
• Anticipate participant inquiries
• Create the ultimate lump-sum window packet
• Prepare for special circumstances

To learn more about lump-sum windows, click here.

Preparing a pension plan termination

The process of terminating a defined benefit (DB) plan is lengthy, time-consuming, and costly. An actuary, trust custodian, attorney, trustee, and investment advisor can assist with many of the duties. In this DB Digest article, Milliman’s Stephanie Sorenson discusses the multiple tasks that plan administrators must accomplish in preparation for a plan termination.

Here’s an excerpt:

Data
It is important to review and validate the participant data. Quality data is critical to the termination process. Insurer quotes will reflect the accuracy, actual or perceived, of the data provided to them.

Also the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC) requires that the plan sponsor maintain the participant and plan data for six years after plan termination (the date on which PBGC Form 501 is filed). The data should be gathered during the plan termination process and remain accessible during the six-year period.

Does the data have valid identification numbers for all participants? Does the data contain valid dates of birth, hire, participation, and termination? If not, review employment records and update.

Does the data include addresses for all participants and beneficiaries? Are the addresses valid? Do any participants reside outside the United States? Many notices are required to be sent during the termination process. An address and death search for all inactive participants may be prudent.
Verifying addresses prior to termination can save time and frustration.

Have all of the accrued benefits been calculated and certified? If yes, does the data include the information that was used to calculate the stored accrued benefit? During the termination process, a Notice of Plan Benefits will need to be supplied to all participants. This notice is required to provide the personal data used to calculate the participant’s accrued benefit along with a statement requesting that the participant correct any information they believe to be incorrect. If the plan has frozen accrued benefits but the calculation data is not available, the best available data must be provided to the participant on the Notice of Plan Benefits along with a statement giving the participant the opportunity to provide the missing data.

If benefits are not calculated and certified, does the data contain all of the information necessary to calculate the benefits? Final benefits will need to be calculated, not estimated, for all participants.

Data is fluid and constantly changes. Participants move, die, quit, get married/divorced, and retire during the termination process. Ensuring and maintaining accurate data is key to preparing for a plan termination.

Pension data cleanup can reduce costs

Data cleanup can help defined benefit (DB) plan sponsors avoid incorrect participant payments and the cost associated with correcting mistakes. Milliman’s Audrey Palmer discusses the potential mishaps that may result from inadequate pension data and the benefits of data cleanup in the DB digest article “Why good data matters.”

Here is an excerpt:

Each year, your plan’s compliance with Internal Revenue Service and Department of Labor regulations also depends on the integrity of the plan’s data. Incomplete or incorrect data can potentially cause noncompliance with many plan-disqualifying regulations, including disclosure requirements, minimum funding requirements, and minimum coverage, participation, and vesting requirements. It can also cause a serious financial burden to participants when excise taxes are imposed that are due to late payment of required minimum distributions. …

… A data cleanup project can make a significant impact to the ongoing administration of your plan by enhancing the individual participant experience, helping to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements, and keeping the plan agile and able to respond to an ever-changing financial and regulatory landscape.

The up-front cost of a data cleanup project is justified when care has been taken to identify the gaps that are easiest to close and will make the most impact. Milliman consultants have experience with this prudent analysis and can help determine which cleanup projects will produce the best return on investment.

An essential part of any data cleanup project is an evaluation of the ongoing periodic data files that provide the participants’ statuses, compensation, hours, and any indicative data to the recordkeeper. Each payroll should undergo a validation check to make certain the expected population, expected totals, and expected statuses are loaded with each file. These checks, combined with a comprehensive analysis of the file produced by the plan sponsor, will catch most errors that could cause ongoing data issues.

Milliman Hangout: Milliman Actuarial Retirement Calculator™ (MARC™)

The Milliman Actuarial Retirement Calculator (MARC) is a pension administration and communication tool for pension plan sponsors. The system offers data storage, benefit calculation, correspondence management, a participant website, and more.

In this video, Milliman’s Kevin Hicks explains some of MARC’s benefits. He also showcases MARC’s participant website.

To learn more about MARC, click here.