Tag Archives: IRS

Regulatory roundup

More retirement-related regulatory news for plan sponsors, including links to detailed information.

House committee approves bill to repeal fiduciary rule
The U.S. House Committee on Education and the Workforce recently voted to approve the “Affordable Retirement Advice for Savers Act” (H.R. 2823), which would repeal the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) rule defining “fiduciary” and restore the regulations and prohibited transaction exemptions that the rule had amended or repealed.

According to a summary released by the committee, the bill would amend ERISA and the tax code to establish a statutory definition of “investment advice” and “ensure that all financial professionals providing personalized advice about retirement investments, distributions, or the use of other advisors are legally required to act in the best interest of their clients.”

To learn more about the bill, click here.

IRS releases draft Form 8717
The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has released Draft Form 8717, User Fee for Employee Plan Determination Letter Request, updated for September 2017. Specific user fee amounts are no longer listed on Form 8717. You must now enter the appropriate user fee when completing line 5. Notice 2011-86 is obsolete.

To download a copy of the draft, click here.

IRS releases final and temporary regulations on W-2 Series, Form W-3, Form 990 Series, and others
The IRS filed final and temporary regulations that update the due dates and extensions of time to file certain tax returns and information returns. The dates are updated to reflect the new statutory requirements set by section 2006 of the Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care Choice Improvement Act of 2015 and section 201 of the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015.

These regulations affect taxpayers who file Form W-2 (series, except Form W-2G), Form W-3, Form 990 (series), Form 1099-MISC, Form 1041, Form 1041-A, Form 1065, Form 1120 (series), Form 4720, Form 5227, Form 6069, Form 8804, or Form 8870.

To read more about the final and temporary regulations, click here. To read more about the proposed regulation, click here.

IRS releases draft W-4P for 2018
The IRS has released a draft copy of Form W-4P, Withholding Certificate for Pension or Annuity Payments, for 2018. The form is for U.S. citizens and resident aliens, or their estates, who are recipients of pensions, annuities (including commercial annuities), and certain other deferred compensation. Use Form W-4P to tell payers the correct amount of federal income tax to withhold from your payment(s). One also may use Form W-4P to choose (a) not to have any federal income tax withheld from the payment (except for eligible rollover distributions or for payments to U.S. citizens to be delivered outside the United States or its possessions) or (b) to have an additional amount of tax withheld.

To download a copy of the draft, click here.

GAO publishes report on older workers and phased retirement programs
The Government Accountability Office (GAO) has released “Older Workers – Phased Retirement Programs, Although Uncommon, Provide Flexibility for Workers and Employers” (GAO-17-536). The report examines:

• Recent trends in the labor force participation of older workers
• The extent to which employers have adopted phased retirement programs and what type of employers offer them
• What challenges and benefits, if any, exist in designing and operating phased retirement programs.

GAO analyzed data from two nationally representative surveys: the Health and Retirement Study (2004-2014) and the Current Population Survey (2005-2016). The agency also reviewed relevant federal laws and regulations, conducted a literature review, and interviewed 16 experts on retirement and nine employers that offer or considered offering phased retirement programs. While phased retirement programs exist in both the private sector and government, the GAO report focuses on private sector programs.

To read the entire report, click here.

Regulatory roundup

More retirement-related regulatory news for plan sponsors, including links to detailed information.

Report on DOL’s fiduciary conflict-of-interest rule
The Congressional Research Service has released “Department of Labor’s 2016 Fiduciary Rule: Background and Issues.” The report explores the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) rule as it applies to pensions, individual retirement accounts, and investments.

To download the report, click here.

IRS updates procedures for multiemployer pension suspension applications
The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has revised the procedures for multiemployer pension plans applying to suspend benefits to avoid insolvency. IRS Revenue Procedure 2017-43 clarifies that multiemployer plans that are in critical or declining status and applying for a benefit suspension must project withdrawal liability payments as part of the projection of a plan’s available resources. It also specifies who should be provided sample notices as part of the application.

For more information, click here.

Regulatory roundup

More retirement-related regulatory news for plan sponsors, including links to detailed information.

IRS issues memo on the application of section 409A to back-to-back arrangement
The Office of Chief Counsel of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has issued a memorandum (No. 201725027) on the application of section 409A to back-to-back arrangement. According to the memo, “Treas. Reg. Section 1.409A-3(i)(6) provides that the amount of the payment under the ultimate service recipient plan may not exceed the amount of the payment under the intermediate service recipient plan. Therefore, the USR Plan fails to meet the requirements of section 409A because the USR Plan provision providing for a payment to Taxpayer in the event of a Participant’s separation from service before vesting is an impermissible payment event.”

For more information, read the entire memo here.

Higher-paid workers more likely to have access to retirement benefits
According to data published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), “Sixty-six percent of private industry workers had access to employer-provided retirement plans in March 2016. Having access means employers offered the benefit, regardless of whether employees chose to participate. Forty-nine percent of private industry workers participated in retirement plans in March 2016. That results in a take-up rate—the percentage of workers with access to a plan who participate in the plan—of 75 percent. Access, participation, and take-up rates were all higher for workers in higher wage groups than for workers in lower wage groups.”

To learn more about the BLS’s data, click here.

Regulatory roundup

More retirement-related regulatory news for plan sponsors, including links to detailed information.

Guidance for remedial amendment period for 403(b) plan
The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued Revenue Procedure 2017-18 providing the last day of the remedial amendment period for § 403(b) plans, for purposes of section 21 of Rev. Proc. 2013-22, 2013-18 I.R.B. 985.

According to the guidance, the last day of the remedial amendment period described in section 2 of this revenue procedure and in section 21 of Rev. Proc. 2013-22 is March 31, 2020. A plan that does not satisfy the requirements of § 403(b) in form on any day during the remedial amendment period (that is, the period beginning on the later of January 1, 2010, or the plan’s effective date, and ending on March 31, 2020) will be considered to have satisfied those requirements if, on or before March 31, 2020, all provisions of the plan that are necessary to satisfy § 403(b) have been adopted and made effective in form and operation from the beginning of the remedial amendment period.

To read the revenue procedure, click here.

Final Rule to adjust for inflation civil monetary penalties
The Department of Labor (DoL) published a final rule to adjust for inflation the civil monetary penalties assessed or enforced in its regulations, pursuant to the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990 as amended by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015 (Inflation Adjustment Act).

The Inflation Adjustment Act requires the DoL to annually adjust its civil money penalty levels for inflation no later than January 15 of each year. The Inflation Adjustment Act provides that agencies shall adjust civil monetary penalties notwithstanding Section 553 of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA). Additionally, the Inflation Adjustment Act provides a cost-of-living formula for adjustment of the civil penalties. Accordingly, this final rule sets forth the DoL’s 2017 annual adjustments for inflation to its civil monetary penalties, effective January 13, 2017.

To read the final rule, click here.

Summary and audit indicators: 403(b) Universal Availability Requirement
The IRS has updated its webpage 403(b) Universal Availability Requirement. A common error occurs when employees, working less than full-time, are automatically excluded from making elective deferrals under the 403(b) plan. A plan that wants to apply the statutory exclusion for part-time employment must determine eligibility for the 403(b) elective deferrals based on whether the employee is reasonably expected to normally work less than 20 hours per week and has actually never worked more than 1,000 hours in the applicable 12-month period.

To visit the webpage, click here.

New mortality assumptions proposed for defined benefit retirement plans

The Treasury Department and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released a proposed rule on December 29, 2016, to update the mortality assumptions that tax-qualified defined benefit (DB) pension plans use to calculate the contributions required under the minimum funding standards of Internal Revenue Code section 430. The proposed effective date is for plan years beginning on or after January 1, 2018; no immediate action by plan sponsors is necessary with regard to the proposed tables, which are expected to increase the plan’s actuarial liabilities and annual benefit accrual costs (i.e., “target liability” and “target normal cost,” respectively).

Once finalized, the mortality tables will also be used to develop pension obligations for reporting to the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC), and Treasury and the IRS will publish a blended version of the tables to be used to calculate “non-level” optional forms of pension payments (e.g., lump-sum distributions) under tax code section 417(e).

The proposed rule adopts base mortality tables derived from the most recent study of the Society of Actuaries (SOA) Retirement Plans Experience Committee, with 2006 being the central year of the mortality experience, and mortality improvement rates from the SOA’s most recent mortality improvement study (MP-2016). The proposed rule offers three choices for selecting mortality tables: “static” tables, “generational” tables, and “plan-specific substitute” tables.

The table below illustrates the increases in actuarial liabilities for sample lives (comparing 2017 vs. 2018 “static” tables at an interest rate of 4%):

Age Male Female
45 (deferred to 65*) 2.8% 6.2%
55 (deferred to 65*) 2.8% 5.9%
65 (in pay status) 3.5% 4.6%
75 (in pay status) 7.2% 4.8%
*The pension benefit commences at age 65.

Plan sponsors should not draw any conclusions of the financial impact on actuarial liabilities or possible increases in cash contributions for a specific pension plan. The benefit formulas, plan demographics, status (“frozen,” “partially frozen,” “open”), and other complex variables are unique to a given plan and must be carefully evaluated.

The IRS seeks public comments on the proposed rule by March 29 and will hold a public hearing in April for plan participants, plan sponsors, pension actuaries, and other interested parties to express their views before issuing a final rule.

For additional information about the proposed revised mortality tables, please contact your Milliman consultant.

Regulatory roundup

More retirement-related regulatory news for plan sponsors, including links to detailed information.

IRS updates 2017 revenue procedures
In an Internal Revenue Bulletin, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) published various revenue procedures, revised for 2017, for issuing letters, rulings, determination letters, and technical advice on specific issues related to employee benefits.

To read the bulletin, click here.

PBGC posts 2017 premium filing instructions
The Comprehensive Premium Filing Instructions for 2017 Plan Years has been approved by Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and is now available on the website of the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC).

To read the filing instructions, click here.

PBGC issues RFI for approving certain alternative methods for computing withdrawal liability
The PBGC is requesting information from the public on issues arising from arrangements between employers and multiemployer plans involving an alternative “two-pool” withdrawal liability method.

PBGC seeks information from the general public and all interested stakeholders, including multiemployer plan participants and beneficiaries, organizations serving or representing retirees and other such individuals, multiemployer plan sponsors and professional advisors, and contributing employers, unions, and other interested parties, about these arrangements, including the various forms they may take, the terms and conditions that apply to new and existing contributing employers who enter into such arrangements, and the benefits and risks these arrangements may present to multiemployer plans and their participants, employers, the multiemployer pension insurance program, and other stakeholders in the multiemployer system.

For more information, click here.

FAQ update on preapproved plan adopting employers
The IRS has updated a series of frequently asked questions (FAQ) providing guidance to employers adopting preapproved retirement plans.

To learn more, click here.