Tag Archives: PFI

July’s corporate pension funding ratio reaches 93.4%, highest in a decade

Milliman today released the results of its latest Pension Funding Index (PFI), which analyzes the 100 largest U.S. corporate pension plans. In July, these pensions experienced a $12 billion increase in funded status due to robust investment returns of 1.15% for the month. Assets increased by $13 billion in July, with the PFI deficit falling from $120 billion to $108 billion, while pension liabilities increased by $1 billion due to a slight dip in the benchmark corporate bond interest rates used to value pension liabilities. The funded ratio climbed from 92.7% at the end of June to 93.4% as of July 31, the highest it’s been in a decade.

Corporate pension funding ratios are back at percentages we saw pre-global financial crisis, though ten years ago discount rates were almost double what they are today. In fact, July’s strong investment returns would have had an even more pronounced impact on these plans, except for the fact that a majority of the Milliman 100 companies have heavy fixed income concentrations.

Looking forward, under an optimistic forecast with rising interest rates (reaching 4.36% by the end of 2018 and 4.96% by the end of 2019) and asset gains (10.8% annual returns), the funded ratio would climb to 99% by the end of 2018 and 115% by the end of 2019. Under a pessimistic forecast (3.86% discount rate at the end of 2018 and 3.26% by the end of 2019 and 2.8% annual returns), the funded ratio would decline to 91% by the end of 2018 and 84% by the end of 2019.

To view the complete Pension Funding Index, click here. To receive regular updates of Milliman’s pension funding analysis, contact us here.

Corporate pension funding increases by $23 billion in June as discount rates hit two-year high

Milliman today released the results of its latest Pension Funding Index (PFI), which analyzes the 100 largest U.S. corporate pension plans. In June, these pensions experienced a $23 billion increase in funded status, with the deficit of the Milliman 100 PFI plans falling from $141 billion at the end of May to $118 billion as of June 30. The improvement was due to an increase in the benchmark corporate bond interest rates used to value pension liabilities, which saw discount rates increase by 13 basis points from 3.99% to 4.12% over the same time period. The funded ratio for the Milliman 100 PFI jumped to 92.8% as of June 30, and would have been higher had it not been for June’s poor investment returns of -0.09%.

Six months into 2018 and corporate pensions are well ahead of where they started at the beginning of the year. The rise in discount rates has helped these pensions stay on track, with June marking the highest rate since January 2016 and the Milliman 100 funding ratio climbing from 87.6% to 92.8% for the first half of the year. This is despite investment performance falling short of expectations so far in 2018.

June’s -0.09% investment return left Milliman 100 PFI asset value to decline from $1.531 trillion at the end of May to $1.526 trillion as of June 30. By comparison, the 2018 Milliman Pension Funding Study reported that the monthly median expected investment return during 2017 was 0.55% (6.8% annualized). The projected benefit obligation (PBO) decreased by $28 billion during June, lowering the Milliman 100 PFI value to $1.644 trillion.

Looking forward, under an optimistic forecast with rising interest rates (reaching 4.42% by the end of 2018 and 5.02% by the end of 2019) and asset gains (10.8% annual returns), the funded ratio would climb to 100% by the end of 2018 and 116% by the end of 2019. Under a pessimistic forecast (3.82% discount rate at the end of 2018 and 3.22% by the end of 2019 and 2.8% annual returns), the funded ratio would decline to 89% by the end of 2018 and 83% by the end of 2019.

To view the complete Pension Funding Index, click here. To receive regular updates of Milliman’s pension funding analysis, contact us here.

Corporate pension funded status dips by $2 billion in May

Milliman today released the results of its latest Pension Funding Index (PFI), which analyzes the 100 largest U.S. corporate pension plans. In May, these pensions experienced a $2 billion dip in funded status as investment gains mostly offset a four-point decrease in the monthly discount rate. The funded ratio for the Milliman 100 PFI remains unchanged at 91.6% as of May 31.

Sometimes no news is good news for corporate pensions. May’s 0.73% investment gain exceeded monthly expectations, and helped balance out the month’s modest decrease in corporate bond rates.

From April 30, 2018, through May 31, Milliman 100 PFI plans experienced a $7 billion increase in asset values, while the projected benefit obligation (PBO) rose by $9 billion. As a result, the deficit increased from $139 billion to $141 billion for the month. Over the last year (June 2017 to May 2018), the Milliman 100 PFI funded status deficit has improved by $116 billion.

Looking forward, under an optimistic forecast with rising interest rates (reaching 4.34% by the end of 2018 and 5.03% by the end of 2019) and asset gains (10.8% annual returns), the funded ratio would climb to 100% by the end of 2018 and 116% by the end of 2019. Under a pessimistic forecast (3.64% discount rate at the end of 2018 and 3.03% by the end of 2019 and 2.8% annual returns), the funded ratio would decline to 87% by the end of 2018 and 81% by the end of 2019.

To view the complete Pension Funding Index, click here. To receive regular updates of Milliman’s pension funding analysis, contact us here.

Corporate pensions’ funded ratio rises to 91.6% despite investment losses in April

Milliman today released the results of its latest Pension Funding Index (PFI), which analyzes the 100 largest U.S. corporate pension plans. In April, these pensions experienced a $20 billion improvement in funded status thanks to an increase in the corporate bond rates used to measure pension liabilities. From March 31, 2018, through April 30, the monthly discount rate increased 12 basis points, from 3.91% to 4.03%; as a result, pension liabilities decreased by $26 billion for the month. The funded ratio for the PFI plans increased from 90.6% to 91.6%, despite a 0.11% investment loss that reduced index assets by $6 billion.

Corporate pensions continue to get some discount rate relief in 2018, despite volatile equity markets. Over the past 12 months, with the rise in rates and a 6.17% cumulative asset gain for these plans, we’ve seen the funded ratio climb from 85.5% to 91.6%.

Looking forward, under an optimistic forecast with rising interest rates (reaching 4.43% by the end of 2018 and 5.03% by the end of 2019) and asset gains (10.8% annual returns), the funded ratio would climb to 101% by the end of 2018 and 117% by the end of 2019. Under a pessimistic forecast (3.63% discount rate at the end of 2018 and 3.03% by the end of 2019 and 2.8% annual returns), the funded ratio would decline to 87% by the end of 2018 and 81% by the end of 2019.

To view the complete Pension Funding Index, click here. This May PFI publication reflects the annual update of the Milliman 100 companies and their latest financial disclosures. To see the 2018 Milliman Pension Funding Study, click here. To receive regular updates of Milliman’s pension funding analysis, contact us here.

Corporate pensions’ investment losses in February buoyed by higher discount rates

Milliman has released the results of its latest Pension Funding Index (PFI), which analyzes the 100 largest U.S. corporate pension plans. Despite the market volatility in February, these pensions experienced a $13 billion improvement in funded status thanks to an increase in the corporate bond rates used to measure pension liabilities. While the market value of assets for these pensions lost $32 billion in February, plan liabilities also shrunk, narrowing the deficit from $219 billion at the end of January to $206 billion as of February 28. The funded ratio for the Milliman 100 PFI rose from 87.3% to 87.7% during the same time period.

Despite the recent market volatility, February’s 21 basis point discount rate increase buoyed pension funding this month. In fact, thanks to strong investment performance in January along with an increase in discount rates in both January and February, overall pension funding for these plans has risen $75 billion over the past two months—not a bad way to start 2018.

Looking forward, under an optimistic forecast with rising interest rates (reaching 4.45% by the end of 2018 and 5.05% by the end of 2019) and asset gains (11.0% annual returns), the funded ratio would climb to 99% by the end of 2018 and 114% by the end of 2019. Under a pessimistic forecast (3.45% discount rate at the end of 2018 and 2.85% by the end of 2019 and 3.0% annual returns), the funded ratio would decline to 82% by the end of 2018 and 75% by the end of 2019.

To view the complete Pension Funding Index, click here. To receive regular updates of Milliman’s pension funding analysis, contact us here.

Corporate pensions’ $61 billion funded status gain in January may cushion early February market slide

Milliman today released the results of its latest Pension Funding Index (PFI), which analyzes the 100 largest U.S. corporate pension plans. While market movement in February may dampen January’s gains, during the first month of 2018 corporate pensions experienced their largest funded status improvements in over a year.

According to Milliman’s analysis, these plans experienced a funding status increase of $61 billion in January, and saw their funded ratio rise from 84.1% at the end of December to 87.2% as of January 31. The improvement is the result of investment gains due to strong market performance and a reduction in liabilities (which was due to an increase in the benchmark corporate bond interest rates used to value pension liabilities).

January’s stellar funding gains may help to cushion the effect of the current market slide witnessed in February thus far for these pensions. It will be interesting to see if the recent volatility paired with U.S. tax reform changes incentivize plan sponsors to pursue funding and de-risking strategies more aggressively than they have in the past.

Looking forward, under an optimistic forecast with rising interest rates (reaching 4.29% by the end of 2018 and 4.89% by the end of 2019) and asset gains (11.0% annual returns), the funded ratio would climb to 99% by the end of 2018 and 115% by the end of 2019. Under a pessimistic forecast (3.19% discount rate at the end of 2018 and 2.59% by the end of 2019 and 3.0% annual returns), the funded ratio would decline to 81% by the end of 2018 and 74% by the end of 2019.

To view the complete Pension Funding Index, click here. To receive regular updates of Milliman’s pension funding analysis, contact us here.